The Cemetery Series: Cementerio de la Chacarita

La Chacarita is the national cemetery of Argentina, and also the country’s largest.  It doesn’t get near the attention that Recoleta gets, which might explain why I saw maybe 10 other people and was asked twice if I was looking for something in the 90 minutes I was there.

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Yeah I am. I’m looking for ideas.

The enormous cemetery was established in 1887 following a yellow fever epidemic and is 230 acres.  It is chock full of notable figures including scientists (Nobel laureate Bernardo Houssay), artists (Antonio Berni, whose work I included in the MALBA post), and tango luminaries (Homero Manzi, Ángel Villoldo, Osvaldo Pugliese, and many others).  There are a number of former presidents, though they seem mostly from dictatorship eras, and also labor leaders and at least one guerrilla leader.  Botanical garden designer and namesake Carlos Thays is buried here, as well.  La Chacarita is absolutely full of Argentina’s history.

It is, unsurprisingly, also chock full of fancy, fancy vaults.

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Tribute to a beloved mother, now missing its inverted exclamation mark
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Very modern design for this crypt.
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Just like in Recoleta, some crypts are in really, really bad shape.

Group pantheons and vaults are also very common.

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Spanish-Argentine Mutual Society Pantheon
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Military pantheon
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The vault for the Sociedad Tipográfica Bonaerense, a 160 year old labor union of typographic workers, one of the first unions here.
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Here lie the founders of the Boca Juniors; I literally cannot overstate the importance of football (soccer) or of the Boca Juniors to it.
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Municipal employees, just in case you want to be buried with your closest co-workers.

Let’s look at two of the most famous burials in La Chacarita.  First up, Carlos Gardel, immensely famous and important tango guy.

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I was there around 4 pm and the shadows were terrible for photos.

The figure on the left is the man himself, who died tragically at the height of his career, at age 45.  Visitors often leave lit cigarettes in his hand.  The figure on the right mournfully hunches over a broken lyre.

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This is the tomb Jorge Newbery, aviation hero and namesake of one of Buenos Aires’s airports (although generally, that airport is referred to as “Aeroparque”).  He died in a plane crash at age 38.  Whoever designed his tomb really brought the drama.

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“Sorry, did you say there’s going to be a carrion bird on the tomb?”  “No, I said there’s going to be five carrion birds on the tomb.”
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“One of them is going to lurk over the actual crypt door.”

Don’t for a second think that I don’t believe with my whole being that this is incredibly awesome.

There are some pretty nice sculptures in La Chacarita, too.

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The broken columns and crumbling look are intentional, by the way.
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This is the memorial and tomb of Enrique de Vedia, a writer and teacher.

Just in case you’re not flush with crypt-levels of cash, the cemetery has several columbarium walls, the oldest of which (at least, as it appeared to me) serve in places as the cemetery’s border wall.

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The newer interments of this type are actually below ground, in a sort of open-air cavern of columbarium walls.

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I didn’t get a picture of the main entry of La Chacarita, as I came in one of the side gates, or a bunch of other buildings and tombs; the place is so freakin’ big, you guys.  I didn’t go into the British or German sections at all (I didn’t even find them).  I’m going to go back at some point, so I will post on those sections when I do.

El Cementerio de La Chacarita is the largest single thing in La Chacarita, with several bus lines and a few stops on the B subway line right near it.  It’s open from 7:30 am to 5 pm.  There’s a free tour in Spanish on the second and fourth Saturdays every month at 10 am (cancelled if it’s raining); check the website for the most up to date information available.

 

Museo Beatle [Beatle Museum]

Tucked in the Paseo La Plaza on Corrientes Ave, the “street that never sleeps” and a center of theater and tango, is the Cavern.

 

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Can’t buy me love, but can buy me a ticket to ride if by “ride” you mean “go into the museum”

Named for the Beatles’ frequent venue, it’s a Beatles-themed complex that includes a cafe, a club, a theater, performance spaces, and a museum.

The Museo Beatle belongs to one of the most charming categories of museum, “personal collection that got way out of hand.”  In this case, Rodolfo Vázquez began collecting Beatles stuff at the age of 10, and by 2001, he had the Guinness Book of World Records certified biggest damn Beatles collection (re-certified in 2011 by Guinness as having 7,700 items).

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Can’t buy me love, but can buy me the catalog in the gift shop

The museum is organized chronologically, and how else would you start, but with the Fab Four’s frickin’ births?

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Original birth certificates, I was told

Don’t worry, Pete Best fans, the museum’s got you covered.

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I’m not actually a big Beatles fan; I don’t know much about them.  I was surprised by how meteoric their rise really was.  They added Ringo and recorded their first album in 1962, released it in 1963, and by 1964, the merch production was insane.

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Authentic Beatle wig, and those squares at the bottom are candy. Licorice candy.

 

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Sure, sounds fun.

 

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That is PANTYHOSE, with their FACES ON IT.

Continuing on through Beatlemania…

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Several videos available throughout the timeline.

…and on to Sgt Pepper’s something something.

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Pig Ringo’s eyeliner wings on point.

I understand Beatles memorabilia, not unlike their aesthetic, gets weirder from here.

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All of us cohabitate in a lemon-hued submersible.
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And we are clean and sober as the day is long.

There are various records, advertisements, and autographs of anyone even tangentially related to the band throughout the museum.  All that is well and good, but you want a photo op.  Of course you do.

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The only true Beatles photo op.

You do, eventually, come to that point on the timeline when things, as all good things do, come to an end.

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Bummer.

But as I’m sure every other person on the planet knows, because I know this, the Beatles didn’t just vanish in 1970.  They all had solo careers!

Visitors will find nooks dedicated to each man’s solo efforts and life decisions.

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I heard John remarried.

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Ringo…well Ringo did some things I was entirely unaware of until five seconds before I took this photo.

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After visiting the museum, you can walk across the courtyard to the cafe and have a typical and filling Argentine lunch for 250 pesos (about US$5.50).

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If you’re a Beatles fan or just want to see a bunch of Beatles stuff, you’ll find The Cavern in the San Nicolás barrio at Av Corrientes 1660, inside the Paseo La Plaza, which is a actually a really lovely complex of shops, restaurants, performance spaces, and trees in the middle of a busy place.  It’s close to the D line and B line of the subway, Congress, the Obelisk–a thousand ways to get there.  The museum entries are 250 pesos (about US$5.50) for foreigners, 200 pesos for Argentines and residents, and free for kids 10 and under.  Check the website for the hours.