Tinytour: Archivo General de la Nación: Huellas de Mujeres Trabajadoras

Popped into the National Archive for the small, temporary exhibit on women workers!  Not super sure on the best translation.  Let’s go with “Impressions of Working Women.”

img_20190702_114952.jpg
That guy’s got nothing to do with anything; it’s just the best photo I got of the door.

There’s an exhibit room just inside the Archive, where visitors don’t have to go through security.  It’s pretty small, but a nice place for a curated show of documents.

img_20190702_114740.jpg
Including not happy documents, like this 1942 petition to a charity for assistance from a nurse who contracted tuberculosis in the course of her work.

Plenty of great old photos, which, of course.  It’s the Archive.

IMG_20190702_114102.jpg
From the School of Nursing affiliated with the Eva Perón Social Help Foundation in 1947.

Actually, though, know what was most impressive?  The freaking exhibit room.

img_20190702_114344.jpg

IMG_20190702_114624.jpg

That’s all for this minipost!  If you’re in Microcentro taking in the government-affiliated tourist sights, you’ll be close to the Archivo General de la Nación.  Pop in for a few minutes to see whatever historic documents they have out for eyeballing and the amazing exhibit room at 25 de mayo 263, weekdays from 10 to 5.

The Cemetery Series: Cementerio de la Chacarita

La Chacarita is the national cemetery of Argentina, and also the country’s largest.  It doesn’t get near the attention that Recoleta gets, which might explain why I saw maybe 10 other people and was asked twice if I was looking for something in the 90 minutes I was there.

IMG_20190607_160446.jpg
Yeah I am. I’m looking for ideas.

The enormous cemetery was established in 1887 following a yellow fever epidemic and is 230 acres.  It is chock full of notable figures including scientists (Nobel laureate Bernardo Houssay), artists (Antonio Berni, whose work I included in the MALBA post), and tango luminaries (Homero Manzi, Ángel Villoldo, Osvaldo Pugliese, and many others).  There are a number of former presidents, though they seem mostly from dictatorship eras, and also labor leaders and at least one guerrilla leader.  Botanical garden designer and namesake Carlos Thays is buried here, as well.  La Chacarita is absolutely full of Argentina’s history.

It is, unsurprisingly, also chock full of fancy, fancy vaults.

IMG_20190607_154849.jpg

img_20190607_154505.jpg
Tribute to a beloved mother, now missing its inverted exclamation mark
IMG_20190607_160152.jpg
Very modern design for this crypt.
IMG_20190607_160251.jpg
Just like in Recoleta, some crypts are in really, really bad shape.

Group pantheons and vaults are also very common.

img_20190607_161325.jpg
Spanish-Argentine Mutual Society Pantheon
img_20190607_154348.jpg
Military pantheon
IMG_20190607_155402.jpg
The vault for the Sociedad Tipográfica Bonaerense, a 160 year old labor union of typographic workers, one of the first unions here.
IMG_20190607_161615.jpg
Here lie the founders of the Boca Juniors; I literally cannot overstate the importance of football (soccer) or of the Boca Juniors to it.
IMG_20190607_163735.jpg
Municipal employees, just in case you want to be buried with your closest co-workers.

Let’s look at two of the most famous burials in La Chacarita.  First up, Carlos Gardel, immensely famous and important tango guy.

img_20190607_162522.jpg
I was there around 4 pm and the shadows were terrible for photos.

The figure on the left is the man himself, who died tragically at the height of his career, at age 45.  Visitors often leave lit cigarettes in his hand.  The figure on the right mournfully hunches over a broken lyre.

IMG_20190607_162542.jpg

This is the tomb Jorge Newbery, aviation hero and namesake of one of Buenos Aires’s airports (although generally, that airport is referred to as “Aeroparque”).  He died in a plane crash at age 38.  Whoever designed his tomb really brought the drama.

IMG_20190607_162026.jpg
“Sorry, did you say there’s going to be a carrion bird on the tomb?”  “No, I said there’s going to be five carrion birds on the tomb.”
IMG_20190607_162117.jpg
“One of them is going to lurk over the actual crypt door.”

Don’t for a second think that I don’t believe with my whole being that this is incredibly awesome.

There are some pretty nice sculptures in La Chacarita, too.

IMG_20190607_160821.jpg
The broken columns and crumbling look are intentional, by the way.
IMG_20190607_155826.jpg
This is the memorial and tomb of Enrique de Vedia, a writer and teacher.

Just in case you’re not flush with crypt-levels of cash, the cemetery has several columbarium walls, the oldest of which (at least, as it appeared to me) serve in places as the cemetery’s border wall.

img_20190607_153918.jpg

The newer interments of this type are actually below ground, in a sort of open-air cavern of columbarium walls.

IMG_20190607_163429.jpg

I didn’t get a picture of the main entry of La Chacarita, as I came in one of the side gates, or a bunch of other buildings and tombs; the place is so freakin’ big, you guys.  I didn’t go into the British or German sections at all (I didn’t even find them).  I’m going to go back at some point, so I will post on those sections when I do.

El Cementerio de La Chacarita is the largest single thing in La Chacarita, with several bus lines and a few stops on the B subway line right near it.  It’s open from 7:30 am to 5 pm.  There’s a free tour in Spanish on the second and fourth Saturdays every month at 10 am (cancelled if it’s raining); check the website for the most up to date information available.

 

Museo Beatle [Beatle Museum]

Tucked in the Paseo La Plaza on Corrientes Ave, the “street that never sleeps” and a center of theater and tango, is the Cavern.

 

img_20190606_122033.jpg
Can’t buy me love, but can buy me a ticket to ride if by “ride” you mean “go into the museum”

Named for the Beatles’ frequent venue, it’s a Beatles-themed complex that includes a cafe, a club, a theater, performance spaces, and a museum.

The Museo Beatle belongs to one of the most charming categories of museum, “personal collection that got way out of hand.”  In this case, Rodolfo Vázquez began collecting Beatles stuff at the age of 10, and by 2001, he had the Guinness Book of World Records certified biggest damn Beatles collection (re-certified in 2011 by Guinness as having 7,700 items).

IMG_20190606_122657.jpg
Can’t buy me love, but can buy me the catalog in the gift shop

The museum is organized chronologically, and how else would you start, but with the Fab Four’s frickin’ births?

IMG_20190606_122712.jpg
Original birth certificates, I was told

Don’t worry, Pete Best fans, the museum’s got you covered.

IMG_20190606_122923.jpg

I’m not actually a big Beatles fan; I don’t know much about them.  I was surprised by how meteoric their rise really was.  They added Ringo and recorded their first album in 1962, released it in 1963, and by 1964, the merch production was insane.

IMG_20190606_123108.jpg
Authentic Beatle wig, and those squares at the bottom are candy. Licorice candy.

 

IMG_20190606_123337.jpg
Sure, sounds fun.

 

IMG_20190606_123257.jpg
That is PANTYHOSE, with their FACES ON IT.

Continuing on through Beatlemania…

IMG_20190606_123348.jpg
Several videos available throughout the timeline.

…and on to Sgt Pepper’s something something.

IMG_20190606_124010.jpg
Pig Ringo’s eyeliner wings on point.

I understand Beatles memorabilia, not unlike their aesthetic, gets weirder from here.

IMG_20190606_124301.jpg
All of us cohabitate in a lemon-hued submersible.
IMG_20190606_124135.jpg
And we are clean and sober as the day is long.

There are various records, advertisements, and autographs of anyone even tangentially related to the band throughout the museum.  All that is well and good, but you want a photo op.  Of course you do.

IMG_20190606_124405.jpg
The only true Beatles photo op.

You do, eventually, come to that point on the timeline when things, as all good things do, come to an end.

IMG_20190606_124455.jpg
Bummer.

But as I’m sure every other person on the planet knows, because I know this, the Beatles didn’t just vanish in 1970.  They all had solo careers!

Visitors will find nooks dedicated to each man’s solo efforts and life decisions.

IMG_20190606_124731.jpg
I heard John remarried.

IMG_20190606_125602.jpg

 

Ringo…well Ringo did some things I was entirely unaware of until five seconds before I took this photo.

IMG_20190606_125114.jpg

After visiting the museum, you can walk across the courtyard to the cafe and have a typical and filling Argentine lunch for 250 pesos (about US$5.50).

IMG_20190606_130727.jpg

If you’re a Beatles fan or just want to see a bunch of Beatles stuff, you’ll find The Cavern in the San Nicolás barrio at Av Corrientes 1660, inside the Paseo La Plaza, which is a actually a really lovely complex of shops, restaurants, performance spaces, and trees in the middle of a busy place.  It’s close to the D line and B line of the subway, Congress, the Obelisk–a thousand ways to get there.  The museum entries are 250 pesos (about US$5.50) for foreigners, 200 pesos for Argentines and residents, and free for kids 10 and under.  Check the website for the hours.

Buque Museo Fragata ARA Presidente Sarmiento [Frigate ARA Presidente Sarmiento Museum Ship]

AHOY!

IMG_20190528_115619.jpg

There are two museum ships in Puerto Madero:  the ARA Uruguay  and her more famous yet less interesting sister, the ARA Presidente Sarmiento.  But just because she doesn’t have the very cool history of the Uruguay doesn’t mean the Presidente Sarmiento is boring.

IMG_20190528_122244.jpg
I’d say that it might be unfair to compare them, but it’s impossible not to, as they are literally within sight of each other.

The Sarmiento was a training ship for the naval academy.  It was English-built and launched in 1897.  Retired in 1961, it’s been a museum since 1964.

IMG_20190528_121024.jpg
I love passageways on ships!  This one has a lot of plaque bling.

Lots of stuff to see from the glory days:

IMG_20190528_121508.jpgIMG_20190528_120435.jpgIMG_20190528_120419.jpgIMG_20190528_120445.jpg

IMG_20190528_120943.jpg
Training sailors got a mattress on their hammocks, so that’s cool.
img_20190528_120905.jpg
This guy had a really fancy pillow embroidered to commemorate his voyage around the world.
IMG_20190528_120644.jpg
Arf.

The sign wasn’t super clear on the origin of the taxidermied Lampazo here, but it seems like in 2014 they decided that he’s probably Buli, owned by Lt Calderon and ship’s pupper on the 37th voyage.  I don’t know how he came to be taxidermied and under glass on the Sarmiento, and I didn’t see anything on board to shed light on that.  Such pressing questions remain mysteries.

IMG_20190528_121431.jpg
There’s no meal service.

The crew dining room now has a video you can watch, and going on through it leads to the officers’ digs, which are nicer.

IMG_20190528_121455.jpg

IMG_20190528_121621.jpg
If you’re an officer, you mattress doesn’t swing.

The Captain’s quarters are off-limits to visitors, presumably because the naval personnel currently assigned to the ship have taken over the best space for offices.  But there’s a nice little model of it.

IMG_20190528_122004.jpg
Command and comfort.

You can climb up on the decks, too, which afford a nice view of the Woman’s Bridge and other ship stuff.

IMG_20190528_122549.jpg
I wasn’t entirely sure I was allowed up on this part, but two navy dudes saw me climbing down and didn’t yell at me, so I assume I was.

The Presidente Sarmiento is open seven days a week, 10 am to 7 pm.  It’s 20 pesos to get on board (at the moment!) and located in Puerto Madero, kind of across the street and to the right from the Casa Rosada.  It’s a very short walk along the river to the ARA Uruguay, so if you’re super into museum ships, you can hit them both.

 

 

Biblioteca Nacional Mariano Moreno de la República Argentina [Mariano Moreno National Library of the Argentine Republic]

The National Library!

img_20190522_140835.jpg
Sometimes the beauty of a library is in the idea, and not the stupid brutalist architecture.

Established in 1810, the library inaugurated its current building in 1992, thirty years after it was first designed (because Argentina).  There are a few things associated with the National Library that I will be including here, such as the Museo del Libro y de la Lengua, which is actually more of a small space for temporary exhibitions and events–not quite enough to do a whole post on.

IMG_20190522_141104.jpg
“…because the library is yours.”  Hell. Yes.

Currently, there’s a couple of exhibits up, one of which is on scientist, novelist, and impressive prizewinner Ernesto Sabato.  You might remember him from a really life-affirming subway display I found awhile back.

sabato-quote.jpg
“God exists, but sometimes dreams: his nightmares are our existence.”

The upstairs currently houses a show on Sara Gallardo.

IMG_20190522_141837.jpg

Like I said, not a whole lot to the museum itself, but as it’s at the back of the library complex, it can easily included in a visit to the whole shebang.

There’s some remodeling happening on the grounds of the library, but there is one small open building that houses the showroom of the Centro de Historieta y Humor Gráfico Argentinos (Argentine Comic and Graphic Humor Center).

img_20190522_143401.jpg

At the moment, the building is dedicated to the 90th anniversary of Patoruzú, who looks VERY QUESTIONABLE to me but is still an icon here, and widely considered Argentina’s first super hero (he’s got super strength and he’s also rich, which is Batman’s sole power, so Patoruzú already has one up on that guy).

IMG_20190522_143417.jpg

The main library building also has its own exhibit space.  You need an ID to go in, a fact that has stuck in my mind since the library played a small part in the story of a man who walked from Canada to Buenos Aires with the aim of visiting the library, only to be turned away because he didn’t have ID.

IMG_20190522_150725.jpg
Pictured: Most secure border in the Western hemisphere.

Right now, there’s an exhibit on the books of Arthur Conan Doyle.  It’s pretty fun.

IMG_20190522_145206.jpg

IMG_20190522_145415.jpg
Sherlock Holmes fan fic has been a hugely profitable genre in its own right, and I especially enjoyed the inclusion of “Cat Holmes.”

IMG_20190522_145520.jpg

IMG_20190522_145712.jpg
The Lost World room! Argentina is rich in dinosaur fossils, and that there is native son Bajadasaurus pronuspinax.
IMG_20190522_150208.jpg
Yeah, they even got the fairy stuff.
IMG_20190522_145855.jpg
Interview with the man himself in the spiritualism room.

img_20190522_150150.jpg

I can absolutely feel the librarian’s giddy enthusiasm for being able to create this room.

If I don’t get a haunted mirror for Christmas this year, why do I even have a family.

There were a few of these pictures that were activated when you walked close to them.  This whole thing was neat.

At the back of the library’s complex, near the Museo del Libro y de la Lengua, is an adorable little shop.

IMG_20190522_152401.jpg
ADORKABLE

It’s the National Library’s bookstore for its publications, where you can also get sweet library merch, like a coffee mug or poster.  There’s also this TINY BOOK VENDING MACHINE SO BRING 20 PESOS IN COINS OK?

IMG_20190522_143121.jpg
Objects in photo less blurry than they appear

So if libraries are a thing for you (as they are for all quality people), you can roll a visit to the National Library into your Recoleta meanderings, as it’s a couple of blocks from the Recoleta Cemetery, the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, and the Las Heras subway stop on the H line.  There’s a cafe of the basic snack and coffee sort on the first floor of the main library building (second floor by US reckoning), but obviously plenty of other places are around.  Check the website for the hours of all the various elements mentioned here.

The Cemetery Series: El Cementerio La Cumbrecita

Welcome to the first entry in the Cemetery Series!  Things will be slightly different in this series–for one thing, I will be including cemeteries that I have visited not-super-recently, which I don’t do for museums because exhibits change, etc.  Cemeteries tend to be a bit more consistent.

I did visit this one, recently, however: El Cementerio La Cumbrecita.  La Cumbrecita is a small pedestrian village in Cordoba, Argentina, that relies entirely on tourism.  It was founded in 1934 by German immigrants who missed the scenery of the old country.  It was rocky, treeless hillscape at first, and there were no roads, but slowly it was transformed into an Alpine-style town surrounded by the pine and spruce trees they planted.  The town went from German-immigrant-summer-home village to a tourist spot, where visitors can now have the slightly dissonant experience of a European village widely populated by green parakeets.

The cemetery is not very easy to get to.

IMG_20190307_154111.jpg

While I found it on Google Maps quickly enough, it is at the top of hill, necessitating a long, occasionally steep walk.  As I discovered later, the cemetery path off the main road is no longer marked.  That’s it on the right there.  I continued left.

Eventually, I ran out of road.  But it was a very long walk, and I wasn’t in the mood to give up.  Looking around, I saw a plank.  Must be a reason for it, right?

IMG_20190307_152838.jpg
All cemeteries should have moats.

I walked carefully across it.  It was readily apparent that there was no path on the other side of the plank, so I hugged the hillside on the right for a couple minutes and then ran out of place to walk.  But, there was a gate, beyond a lame-ass fence up the incline on the right.

IMG_20190307_153220.jpg
Looks promising!

Seemed like an unorthodox way to get into a cemetery, but I didn’t see a more legit looking entrance, so I climbed up the hillside and wiggled under the fence, as you do.  Maybe it was the back gate?

It was in fact the front, and only, gate.

IMG_20190307_153242.jpg
It was unlocked! I wouldn’t have scaled the wall if it had been. Probably.

The cemetery yard is a very small place, laid out on the hillside.  I have to think that most of the graves are for ashes (or are only memorial plaques), because they’re rather teeny.  It’s a peaceful, overgrown spot, full of wildflowers and buzzing insects.

IMG_20190307_153338.jpgIMG_20190307_153346.jpgIMG_20190307_153458.jpgIMG_20190307_153357.jpgIMG_20190307_153746.jpgIMG_20190307_153555.jpgIMG_20190307_153639.jpgIMG_20190307_153636.jpg

It only takes a few minutes to walk though the whole place, which you might or might not find gratifying after the long hike up, depending on how into quiet, hidden graveyards you are.  I discovered on the way out that there was a path that did not require wiggling under a fence that led to the main road.  So that was nice.

You can find more information on La Cumbrecita here; it’s a lovely little place to relax and hike and dip your feet in the river.