Museo Casa de Yrurtia [Yrurtia House Museum]

HELLO HI

I AM BACK

And for today I have the long-closed-for-renovations-but-now-open Casa de Yrurtia!  And it is looking pretty nice after years of closure.

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Quaint!

Rogelio Yrurtia was an important Argentine sculptor in the early 20th century.  As a talented young man in 1899, he was awarded a scholarship, on which he traveled to Paris.  He would spend his career moving between Paris and Buenos Aires, where he would be known for his large scale, public works.

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The man’s own tools, and a really nifty table about the sculpting process that visitors can put their grubby fingers all over.

The museum is in the home of Yrurtia and his wife, the also very important artist Lía Correa Morales.  The couple donated the house to the country to establish as a museum.  It opened to the public in 1949; Yrurtia died the following year. Lía Correa Morales then served as the museum’s director.

 

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The house side. 

The house rooms include the some of the couple’s own art collection, which I guess is a big plus to having a lot of artist friends.

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Yeah well *I* have a bunch of pretty cool postcards.

The collection on display isn’t really extensive, but it is really interesting and frequently huge.  Stands to reason; Yrurtia was a big deal in public and monument art.  Maybe you think it’s kind of a juvenile assessment, being stuck on the size, but that’s probably because you haven’t been in the same small room as stuff that was designed to be viewed from far away.

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That is a normal-sized doorway.

At a certain point, the size is kind of an overwhelming feature.

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A study for a big Moses.

Yrurtia created a monument to Manuel Dorrego, who had (stay with me here, Argentine history is kind of dramatic) opposed the government of the first president, Bernardino Rivadavia, and was named governor of Buenos Aires province following Rivadavia’s resignation.  Dorrego himself was not long after overthrown and executed in 1828.

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He’s interred in Recoleta cemetery.  And so is the guy who executed him.  And Founding Father José de San Martín, who had been in Europe, took one look at the whole mess, declined to get involved and went back to Europe.

Incidentally, Yrurtia also sculpted the tomb of Bernardino Rivadavia, which is in Plaza Miserere.

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He specifically asked that his body not be returned to Buenos Aires after he died (in Spain), but alas.

And here is a Justice (commissioned by super rich guy Carlos Delcasse for his tomb and copied in bronze for the national Supreme Court), depicted non-traditionally, without scales or blindfold.

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But also kind of like she’s going to strangle you?

The museum also shows how the sausage is made, sculpture-ly speaking, which I recall reading somewhere was part of the point of the museum’s creation (as the house was also his workshop) but now I can’t find the source for that.

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How to get a “head” in sculpture lololol
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These are videos of the process.

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The museum does have a room about Lía Correa Morales, which it should, as she was also an important artist and doesn’t even get her name on the museum itself.

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Finally, the house has a sweet garden, in which stands one of Yrurtia’s last works, The Boxers.

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Uh, it’s in the back there.

Like most (all?) of the small, state- or city-run museums, this one also hosts workshops and events.  The staff is very nice!  There wasn’t any English material on hand, so they printed out some translations for us.  The museum is in Belgrano, not terribly far from the D subway line, and open Wednesday through Friday from 10am to 6pm and Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 6pm.

 

Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes [National Museum of Fine Arts]

Bellas Artes is one of the big dogs, obviously.

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It contains not one but two gift shops.

As such, it has a very fine collection, and since this is a blog post, I will not be providing a thorough overview.   For one thing, the museum has a very nice website partially available in English (and a guide app only in Spanish).  So I’m just going to do a light overview!  There’s just so much art!

Obviously, as a national fine arts museum, Bellas Artes has a strong collection of Argentine and Latin American art.  The international collection trends noticeably to European art.  Let’s have a peek, starting with these things, because I am a big fan of hair decoration:

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Who has this much hair
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How do these not cause headaches

These are peinetónes, very large versions of the Spanish peineta that were distinct to the fashion of the Rio de la Plata region in the 1830s, until shitty men took to criticizing the elaborate and expensive combs in the most sexist way possible (“terrible women neglect their families and whore themselves out in pursuit of this extravagance!”), and their use declined.  You can find several contemporary illustrations mocking the peinetón.  Certainly, there are reasonable criticisms to be made of fashions that are uncomfortable, inconvenient, and costly, but “look at these shallow immoral bimbos” is just the worst.

On to the older European stuff!

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St John here giving you a big hint as to who the principal subject here is, or else trying to draw attention to the incredibly inappropriate baby toy.

Early 1500s Virgin and Child with St John from Florence.

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If I ever have a castle, Imma get so many tapestries

This is a Belgian-made tapestry from the early 1600s.  As someone who can barely sit still long enough to embroider a simple outline figure on a handkerchief, I am always deeply impressed by tapestries.

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If you leave severed heads laying around, the baby is totally going to get into them.

This is a 17th century wood sculpture, “An angel with the head of St John the Baptist.”  This stuff is all pretty typical of the time and region.

Moving forward, time-wise, the collection includes examples from a lot of the big dudes, El Greco, Rubens, Rembrant, Degas, van Gogh, Monet, Kandinsky, Pollock, Rothko, and so on.

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Raymond Monvoision, “self portrait,” early 1800s France.
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Goya, doing Goya things.

There’s a lot of Rodin, owing to the museum’s first director’s admiration of him.

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“The Earth and the Moon,” 1898, because how many times do you really want to look at “The Kiss”
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Henry Moore, “Reclining Figure, External Forms

But let’s turn our attention to the Argentine artists, my very favorite feature of Bellas Artes.

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Cándido López’s “Wintering Eastern Army,” more beautiful in person than any photo I’ve seen.
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“To the Sunshine” by Fernando Fader, 1922, included here because she’s knitting.
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“Nude” by Emilia Bertolé, 1919

And into more modern styles:

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“The Improviser,” Emilio Pettoruti, 1937

And mixed media works, such as Jorge de la Vega’s “A Timid Person’s Intimacy” (1963):

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There are also, of course, Argentine sculptors represented, such as Alberto Heredia, who worked with discarded items to create his censorship allegory “The Gagged” in the early 1970s.

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JEEEEEZUS WHAT THE HELL MAN

I’m also tacking on Joaquín Torres Garcia, who wasn’t Argentine but Uruguayan, because I really love his stuff so much.

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“Contrast,” 1931

Finally, here’s views of a couple of galleries, to give you a feel for the place, and the difference between the classical art galleries and the modern ones.

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The Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes is big and pink and hard to miss at Av. de Libertador 1473 in Recoleta.  You can get there on a lot of bus lines and the H line of the subway.  It’s open 11am to 8pm Tuesdays through Fridays and 10am to 8pm Saturdays and Sundays.  It’s free for Argentina residents and 100 pesos (currenetly about 3 bucks US) for non-residents, although it is free on Tuesdays and 645pm-8pm Wednesdays through Sundays.  There’s a free English tour at 230pm on Wednesdays and Fridays.  Most of the signage is also in English.